Category Archives: Level One Studio

New Level 1 Projects and material relevant to completed ones.
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Everything and Nothing 2

https://learningonscreen.ac.uk/ondemand/index.php/prog/01B352CD?bcast=121619669

Episode 2

Nothing

Tuesday, 10 May 2016, 00:00 60 mins

BBC4

Synopsis
Two-part documentary which deals with two of the deepest questions there are – what is everything, and what is nothing?

In two epic, surreal and mind-expanding films, Professor Jim Al-Khalili searches for an answer to these questions as he explores the true size and shape of the universe and delves into the amazing science behind apparent nothingness.

The second part, Nothing, explores science at the very limits of human perception, where we now understand the deepest mysteries of the universe lie. Jim sets out to answer one very simple question – what is nothing? His journey ends with perhaps the most profound insight about reality that humanity has ever made. Everything came from nothing. The quantum world of the supersmall shaped the vast universe we inhabit today, and Jim can prove it.

Mark Adams

Everything and Nothing

https://learningonscreen.ac.uk/ondemand/index.php/prog/019D4932?bcast=121572787

Episode 1

Everything
Tuesday, 3 May 2016, 00:00 60 mins
BBC4

Synopsis
Two-part documentary which deals with two of the deepest questions there are – what is everything, and what is nothing?

In two epic, surreal and mind-expanding films, Professor Jim Al-Khalili searches for an answer to these questions as he explores the true size and shape of the universe and delves into the amazing science behind apparent nothingness.

The first part, Everything, sees Professor Al-Khalili set out to discover what the universe might actually look like. The journey takes him from the distant past to the boundaries of the known universe. Along the way he charts the remarkable stories of the men and women who discovered the truth about the cosmos and investigates how our understanding of space has been shaped by both mathematics and astronomy.

Mark Adams

Who’s Afraid of Conceptual Art?

Synopsis

Dr James Fox has never really got conceptual art. And he’s not alone. Conceptual art has been treated with suspicion and incredulity by virtually everyone outside the art world for nearly a hundred years. Ever since Marcel Duchamp first displayed a signed urinal and claimed it was art in 1917. So was he taking the piss? Or was he on to something, creating a whole new approach to art that has now lasted a century? 

Dr Fox embarks on an open-minded guide for the perplexed and asks ‘What is conceptual art?’ ‘How should we approach it?’ and crucially, ‘Why should we care?’. Roaming between the past, present and future he examines a mind-bending selection of the most influential conceptual ideas and artworks, alongside meeting the leading movers and shakers of today. And who knows? In the end, Dr Fox might find himself unexpectedly seduced by this trickiest of art forms.

Mark Adams

Site and Duration Jeroen van Dooren

Our first performance workshop was based on movement of the body and language in performances. This second session I thought it would be fitting to focus on site and duration. We are probably all self isolating or staying inside as much as possible, I hope everyone is okay, and the performances and exercises are made to fit this new situation.

It is also an opportunity to think about alternative spaces, away from the ‘normal’ white cube situation. This not only in regards to performances but also as a space of exhibiting. The aim is to get a better understanding of or a different way of using a space and place as a basis of a site-specific performance or durational performance.

We have worked on repetition in our previous session and I would like to continue working on repetition and introduce durational elements in our first exercises. The emphasise is on the exercise and not so much on the end product.

Imagine your house or room is the place where you hold a performance in front of an audience. Try and keep everything in your room as it is. You don’t need much space for the exercises. 

Treat all the exercises as performances and remember like last time; concentrate and the performance starts from when you start walking/moving onto your performance area/room.

Drawing exercises

  1. Make 10-line drawings for 5 minutes. Each drawing shouldn’t last longer than 10/15 seconds. It is more about the repetition than the outcome. It doesn’t need to be on nice paper it can be on the back of envelopes, newspapers, magazines anything you can draw on.
  2. Repeat this with 5-line drawings.
  3. Repeat this with 1-line drawings.

Please take images of the drawings.

Writing exercises

  1. Write for 5 min without stopping – Stream of consciousness. Try and write for 5 continuous minutes without stopping it can be anything as long as you continue to write. When you get stuck and don’t know what to write, write this down. – I don’t know what to write I don’t know what to write etc. Please start with the sentence/idea: A sound I remember from a long time ago. This exercise can be done in any language.
  2. Please do the same again but this time 10 minutes. The starting sentence this time is: The place I am in.

Please pick 2 or 3 sentences of each exercise and record them whilst reading them out loud.

Objects

  1. Show an object from the room your are situated in and tell/record what your relation to the object is; did you find it, is it a gift, is it in your possession for a long time, do you like it, has it a specific function or meaning? How does it relate to you?
  2. Imagine you being the object and make a performance as you being the object. This does not need to be literal e.g. if you show a teapot you don’t need to pretend you are a teapot. It can be an abstract idea you have about the teapot.
  3. Make a small performance max one minute with the object.

The space you’re in.

  1. Make a maximum 5-minute repetitive performance using the space and the objects in the room you are in. This does not need to be complicated. You can organise and disorganise your books over and over again, turn your tv off and on and off and on etc.
  2. For the last performance I would like you to use the objects, repetitions, 2 or 3 sentences, drawings in a 10 to 15-minute performance. Try and use all the material you produced. You can use it in any way you want the only ‘rule’ I have is that you shouldn’t use more text than the 2 or 3 sentences, of course they can be used repetitive.

Please record as much as you can so I can give you feedback.

Some inspiration:

https://frieze.com/article/nikhil-chopra-sleeps-met-and-uncovers-its-colonial-past

https://www.yukikoba.com/

https://www.simonleegallery.com/artists/192-donna-huanca/

https://www.jadeblackstock.com/about

http://www.lucabosani.com/

https://www.whitechapelgallery.org/exhibitions/william-kentridge/

And last but not least have fun and a pillow is a great way of stabilising your phone whilst recording.